Nutrient loading, transformations, and management in irrigated agroecosystems

Who is the funding agency?: 
USDA - National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Please categorize the nature of the Source of Support: 
Other Gov
Status: 
Denied
Date Submitted: 
Wed, 2013/02/20
Date of Denial Notification: 
Wed, 2013/08/21
Award Amount: 
$0.00
Location: 
Logan River

Although freshwater rivers and lakes are becoming more eutrophic throughout the American West, little is known about the effects of different types of irrigation infrastructure on nutrient uptake and water quality. While irrigation districts may improve water use efficiency by replacing open and unlined canals with lined or piped systems, these types of improvements may reduce riparian vegetation that biogeochemically processes nitrogen and phosphorus.

Management Team meeting

Event Type (OLD DATA): 
Team Meetings
URL: 
Will this event be attended by non-EPSCoR participants: 
No

Bi-weekly Management Team Meeting

Neighborhood Typologies

PI meeting

Event Type (OLD DATA): 
Team Meetings
URL: 
Will this event be attended by non-EPSCoR participants: 
No

Bi-weekly PI conference call

Drivers of Urban Water Use

Peer Reviewed: 
Yes
What level of funding support did EPSCoR provide for this publication?: 
Primary
Date Submitted: 
Wed, 2013/01/09
Date of Publication: 
2014/03
NSF Acknowledgement: 
Acknowledged
Journal, Book, Magazine or Newspaper Name: 
Journal of Sustainable Cities and Society

In this paper we develop water demand models for four common urban land use types based on climate, demographics, and built environmental variables. The water demand models estimate annual water use at the parcel level for each land use type: single family residential, semi attached residential, apartments, and commercial. We hypothesize that water use is a function of climate, demographic, and built environmental variables and assessed whether the relative importance of these demographic, built environment, and climate variables on urban water use varies by land use type.

Drivers of Urban Water Use

Non-EPSCoR Presenters: 
Date: 
Tue, 2013/01/15
What is the name of the event (if any) where you presented?: 
Global Change and Sustainability Center Symposium

In this paper we develop water demand models for four common urban land use types based on climate, demographics, and built environmental variables. The water demand models estimate annual water use at the parcel level for each land use type: single family residential, semi attached residential, apartments, and commercial. We hypothesize that water use is a function of climate, demographic, and built environmental variables and assessed whether the relative importance of these demographic, built environment, and climate variables on urban water use varies by land use type.

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