Collaborative Research: ABI Development: IsoBank: A centralized repository for isotopic data

Who is the funding agency?: 
NSF
Please categorize the nature of the Source of Support: 
Other NSF
Status: 
Pending
Date Submitted: 
Thu, 2017/09/07
Date of Pending Notification: 
Wed, 2018/05/23
Award Amount: 
$0.00
Location: 
University of Utah

Overview. Stable isotope data have made pivotal contributions to nearly every discipline of the physical and natural sciences. The isotopes held within organic and inorganic substrates integrate across broad spatial and temporal scales –– from individual organisms to the global geo-ecosphere and across ancient to contemporary timescales. While the pace of growth in the generation of isotopic data rivals that of genetics, the latter field is now driven by “omic”-based approaches based on large publicly accessible centralized databases that have produced ground-break discoveries.

Collaborative Research: MSB-ENSA: Leveraging NEON to Build a Predictive Cross-scale Theory of Ecosystem Transpiration

Who is the funding agency?: 
NSF
Please categorize the nature of the Source of Support: 
Other NSF
Status: 
Pending
Date Submitted: 
Mon, 2017/10/16
Date of Pending Notification: 
Mon, 2018/05/21
Award Amount: 
$0.00
Location: 
University of Utah

Transpiration (T) is an inevitable counterpart of photosynthesis, and integrates information on plant water use at scales from the leaf to the globe. Quantifying and characterizing properties of transpiration, and how these emerge from structural and functional properties within and across ecosystems, offers a powerful way to develop and test theory for ecosystem gas fluxes that is scalable in space and time.

Variability of Combustion-Derived Vapor and its influence on Meteorology in the Urban Atmosphere

Who is the funding agency?: 
NSF
Please categorize the nature of the Source of Support: 
Other NSF
Status: 
Denied
Date Submitted: 
Thu, 2018/02/08
Date of Denial Notification: 
Thu, 2017/08/10
Award Amount: 
$0.00
Location: 
University of Utah

Water released to the atmosphere through fossil fuel combustion is a minor contributor to the global hydrologic cycle, but the spatiotemporal focusing of these emissions may significantly impact boundary layer composition, meteorology, and chemistry within urban areas. Recent work within the Salt Lake Valley (SLV, Utah) demonstrated a new method to apportion observed humidity between CDV and advected ‘natural’ water vapor using stable water vapor isotopes, and suggested that CDV may enhance specific humidity by >10% during winter cold air pool events.

• The oceans: impacts on local climate

Date: 
Tue, 2016/11/22
What is the name of the event (if any) where you presented?: 
Guest lecture for GEO 3800 The Oceans, University of Utah, Department of Geology and Geophysics, Salt Lake City, Utah

Lecture on role of oceans in driving global scale climate variability, focusing on teleconnections and the impacts of surface mass and energy fluxes.

Research Project Management

Date: 
Fri, 2017/08/11
What is the name of the event (if any) where you presented?: 
Faculty Development Workshop, Pakistan Academy of Science, Islamabad, Pakistan

Workshop on how to manage research projects focused on early career faculty or faculty with limited experience in externally funded research

• Curriculum and course development

Date: 
Thu, 2017/08/10
What is the name of the event (if any) where you presented?: 
Faculty Development Workshop, Pakistan Academy of Science, Islamabad, Pakistan

Workshop on how to develop and assemble courses needed for a logical and effective curriculum focused on climate and water resources

• Global water balance

Date: 
Thu, 2017/09/07
What is the name of the event (if any) where you presented?: 
guest lecture for GEO 5650 Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Utah, Department of Geology and Geophysics, Salt Lake City, Utah

Presented a quantitative framework for understanding water balance in the surface and atmosphere

• Atmospheric circulation and global energy balance

Date: 
Tue, 2017/09/05
What is the name of the event (if any) where you presented?: 
Guest lecture for GEO 5650 Hydrology and Water Resources, University of Utah, Department of Geology and Geophysics, Salt Lake City, Utah

Lecture on how global-scale hydroclimatic variations relate to the atmospheric general circulation (Hadley cells, trade winds, etc.).

Water supply versus demand in Utah's future

Non-EPSCoR Presenters: 
Adam Kochanski, Craig Miller Candace Hassenyager
Date: 
Mon, 2018/05/14
What is the name of the event (if any) where you presented?: 
Central Utah Water Symposium

For the major river basins of Utah, we analyze the ratio of water supply to demand considering effects of climate change on supply and effects of future population change on demand. Climate modeling indicates modest increases in net available water for Utah (precipitation minus evapotranspiration) through the end of the current century, with increasing water vulnerability largely driven by population growth.

Precipitation and Glacier Mass Balance in High Mountain Asia Over the Modern Era

Who is the funding agency?: 
NASA
Please categorize the nature of the Source of Support: 
Other Gov
Non-EPSCoR PI/Co-PI: 
Summer Rupper, Adam Kochanski, Jim Steenburgh
Status: 
Awarded
Date Submitted: 
Fri, 2016/01/01
Award Amount: 
$737,000.00
Award Dates: 
Thu, 09/01/2016 to Sat, 08/31/2019
Location: 
University of Utah, Brigham Young University

Objectives: The proposed work aims to quantify the temporal and spatial variability in precipitation over High Mountain Asia
(HMA), and impacts of this variability on glacier mass balance over the modern era (1980-present).
Motivation: Precipitation is a critical component of many physical and environmental systems within HMA, including glacier systems
that serve as a freshwater resource to populations living within and downstream of these glaciated mountains. Unfortunately, there are

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